Subway’s Chicken = Less than 50% Actual Chicken submitted by @T_J_Rooth

subway oven roasted chicken

Hungry for more detail about that Subway chicken report? Here’s more about the test that everyone’s talking about, including the results on the sandwich chain’s chicken.

Subway stands behind its chicken.

The sandwich chain is disputing the findings of a CBC Marketplace investigation into fast food chicken. While most of the samples were found to contain close to 100 per cent chicken DNA, Subway sandwiches contained substantially less than the other chains. Tests showed an average of 53.6 per cent chicken DNA for the oven-roasted chicken and 42.8 per cent for the chicken strips.

DNA tests don’t reveal an exact percentage of the amount of chicken in the whole piece, but DNA experts have told Marketplace that the testing is a good indicator of the proportion of animal and plant DNA in the product.

Trent University’s Wildlife Forensic DNA Laboratory stands by its test results.

Robert Hanner, a biologist and associate director for the Canadian Barcode of Life Network at the University of Guelph, Ont., said DNA results “cannot be taken as exact mass ratios in the product,” but he adds they are a good indicator of how much soy is in Subway’s chicken.

Here’s what’s in Subway chicken

Subway declined to speak with Marketplace on camera about the findings, and declined to show Marketplace where and how its chicken is made.

The chain did confirm, by email, the ingredients in its chicken:

  • Chicken strips: Boneless, skinless, chicken breasts, water, soy protein concentrate, modified potato starch, sodium phosphate, potassium chloride, salt, maltodextrin, yeast extract, flavours, spices, dextrose, onion powder, carmelized sugar, paprika, chicken broth, vinegar solids, paprika extract.
  • Chicken patty: Chicken breast meat, water, seasoning (sea salt, sugar, chicken stock, salt, flavours, canola oil, onion powder, garlic powder, spice, chicken fat, honey), soy protein, sodium phosphates.

Source: Subway defends its chicken after CBC Marketplace report – Business – CBC News